Suggested Readings

This list is constantly being updated, so please check back often!

Suggested by Adam Rogers:

Other Suggested Readings:

Maker Spaces

Digital Libraries

  • Bailey, J., & Owens, T. From records to Data with Viewshare: An Argument, an interface, a design. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, 38(4), 41-11.
  • Cottrell, M. (2013). Paperless libraries. American Libraries, 44(9/10), 11–12.
  • Fox, R. (2011). Forensics of digital librarianship. OCLC Systems & Services, 27(4), 264–271. doi: 10.1108/10650751111182560
  • Free, D. (2012). Cornell digitizes mathematics oral history. College & Research Libraries News, 73(1).
  • Galina-Russell, I. (2012). Challenges for the creation of digital resources in the humanities. Profesional de la Informacion, 21(2), 185–189.
  • Ghani, S. R. (2012). Digital preservation: A Paradox or sophism? SRELS Journal of Information Management, 49(5), 529–534.
  • Gooding, P. (2013). Mass digitization and the garbage dump: The conflicting needs of quantitative and qualitative methods. Literary & Linguistic Computing, 28(3), 425–431.
  • Gordon, G. J. (2010). What we don’t know we don’t know. Against the Grain, 22(4), 18–20.
  • Gracy, K. F., & Kahn, M. B. (2012). Preservation in the digital age. Library Resources & Technical Services, 56(1), 25–43.
  • Gunatilleke, G. (2012). HathiTrust. Charleston Advisor, 13(4), 43–46. doi: 10.5260/chara.13.4.43
  • Hombal, S. G., & Prasad, K. N. (2012). Digital copyright protection: Issues in the digital library environment. DESIDOC Journal of Library & Information Technology, 32(3), 233–239.
  • Howard, K. (2010). Programming not required: Skills & knowledge for the digital library environment. Australian Academic & Research Libraries, 41(4), 260–275.
  • Kane, L. T., & American Library Association. (2011). Working in the Virtual Stacks: The New Library and Information Science. ALA Editions.
  • Kempf, K. (2013). Collection development in the digital age. Italian Journal of Library & Information Science, 4(2), 267–273. doi: 10.4403/jlis.it-8857
  • Leonardo, D. (2012). Google Books: primary sources in the public domain. Collection Building, 31(3), 103–107. doi: 10.1108/01604951211243498
  • Mahapatra, R. K. . (2012). Digital content creation and management in agricultural libraries in India: Issues and trends. DESIDOC Journal of Library & Information Technology, 32(1), 31–37.
  • Myntti, J., & Cothran, N. (2013). Authority control in a digital repository: Preparing for linked data. Journal of Library Metadata, 13(2/3), 95–113. doi: 10.1080/19386389.2013.826061
  • NYU creates Arabic collections online. (2013). Advanced Technology Libraries, 42(9), 10–10.
  • Ross, S. (2012). Digital preservation, archival science and methodological foundations for digital libraries. New Review of Information Networking, 17(1), 43–68. doi: 10.1080/13614576.2012.679446
  • Seadle, M. (2012). Archiving in the digital world: the scholarly literature. Library Hi Tech, 30(2), 367–375. doi: 10.1108/07378831211240021
  • Stauffer, A. (2012). Nineteenth-century archive in the digital age. European Romantic Review, 23(3), 335–341. doi: 10.1080/10509585.2012.674264
  • Storey, C. (2011). Bibliobabble? The surge towards a print→less e-library recasts academic librarians as “rare book engineers”. Part of special issue Academic librarian: singing in the rain, part 2, 32(1/2), 73–84. doi: 10.1108/01435121111102593
  • Thompson, K., & Richard, J. (2013). Moving our data to the Semantic web: Leveraging a content management system to create the linked open library. Journal of Library Metadata, 13(2/3), 290–309. doi: 10.1080/19386389.2013.828551
  • Tzoc, E., & Millard, J. (2011). Technical skills for new digital librarians. Library Hi Tech News, 28(8), 11–15. doi:10.1108/07419051111187851
  • Walters, T., Skinner, K., & Association of Research Libraries. (2011). New roles for new times: Digital curation for preservation (No. 1-5940-7862-9). Association of Research Libraries.
  • Weisbard, P. H. (2011). Oldies but goodies: Archiving web-based information. Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women’s Studies Resources, 32(2), 14–20.
  • Yuan Li. (2011). Institutional repositories and digital preservation: Assessing current practices at research libraries. D-Lib Magazine, 17(5/6), 1–11. doi:10.1045/may2011-yuanli

Data Curation

  • Fox, R. (2012). Digital libraries: the systems analysis perspective. OCLC Systems & Services, 28(4), 170–175. doi:10.1108/10650751211279102
  • Harris-Pierce, R. L., & Liu, Y. Q. (2012). Is data curation education at library and information science schools in North America adequate? New Library World, 113(11/12), 598–613. doi:10.1108/03074801211282957
  • Huwe, T. K. . (2012). Big data, big future. Computers in Libraries, 32(5), 20–22.
  • Kenyon, J., Godfrey, B., & Eckwright, G. Z. (2012). Geospatial data curation at the University of Idaho. Journal of Web Librarianship, 6(4), 251–262. doi:10.1080/19322909.2012.729983
  • Lage, K., Losoff, B., & Maness, J. (2011). Receptivity to library involvement in ccientific data curation: A Case study at the University of Colorado Boulder. portal: Libraries & the Academy, 11(4), 915–937.
  • Latham, B., & Poe, J. W. (2012). Library as partner in university data curation: A Case study in collaboration. Journal of Web Librarianship, 6(4), 288–304. doi:10.1080/19322909.2012.729429
  • Moore, R., & Weaver, M. (2012). RDAP12 program overview. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, 38(5), 12–13.
  • Ogburn, J. L. (2010). Imperative for data curation. portal: Libraries & the Academy, 10(2), 241–246.
  • Primary Research Group. (2013). International survey of academic library data curation practices. New York: Primary Research Group.
  • Walton, G. (2010). Data curation and the academic library. New Review of Academic Librarianship, 16(1), 1–3. doi: 10.1080/13614531003640427
  • Xiao, N., & American Chemical Society, Division of Chemical Information. (2012). Special issues in data management / McEwen, Leah Rae,; editor of compilation. Washington, DC: American Chemical Society.

Digital Scholarship

  • Adams, J. L., & Gunn, K. B. (2012). Digital humanities: Where to start. College & Research Libraries News, 73(9), 536–539, 569.
  • Aljayyousi, M. I. (2012). iCriticism: Rethinking the roles and uses of computation and the computer in literary studies (Ph.D.). Indiana University of Pennsylvania, United States — Pennsylvania.
  • Anakin, M. (2012). Digital scholar: How technology is transforming scholarly practice. New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 47(1), 167–168.
  • Anderson, S., & Blanke, T. (2012). Taking the long view: from e-science humanities to humanities digital ecosystems. Historical social research, 37(3), 147–164.
  • Anonymous. (2013). Unlocking the riches of HathiTrust. American Libraries, 44(1/2), 40–43.
  • Armitage, D. (2012). What’s the big idea? Intellectual history and the longue durée. History of European Ideas, 38(4), 493–507. doi: 10.1080/01916599.2012.714635
  • Armstrong, W. M. (2012). Citing, compiling, and documenting: Sustaining use of big data research in the digital humanities. UNC Chapel Hill Theses, 1–1.
  • Ayers, E. L. . (2013). Does digital scholarship have a future? Educause Review, 48(4), 24–34.
  • Baca, M. R. O. (2013). Digital art history / Helmreich, Anne. Oxfordshire, U.K.: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Bailar, M. L. (2010). Shaping new fields of scholarly inquiry in and beyond the humanities. Houston: Rice University Press.
  • Ballor, J. J. (2012). Dynamics of primary source and electronic resource: The Digital Renaissance and the Post-Reformation digital library. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Online), 38(4), 16–19.
  • Barker, E., Bissell, C., Hardwick, L., Jones, A., Ridge, M., & Wolffe, J. (2012). Colloquium: Digital technologies–help or hindrance for the humanities? Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 11(1), 16.
  • Bayne, G. (2011). Library spaces for the scholarship process. EDUCAUSE Review, 46(4).
  • Berry, D. M. (2012). Understanding digital humanities. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Bethany Nowviskie. (s.d.). Retrieved from http://nowviskie.org/
  • Bierman, J., & Valentino, M. L. (2011). Podcasting initiatives in American research libraries. Library Hi Tech, 29(2), 349–358. doi: 10.1108/07378831111138215
  • Bodard, G. (2010). Digital research in the study of classical antiquity / Mahony, Simon. Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
  • Bodenhamer, D. J. C. (2010). GIS and the future of humanities scholarship. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Brienza, C. (2012). Opening the wrong gate? The academic spring and scholarly publishing in the humanities and social sciences. Publishing Research Quarterly, 28(3), 159–171. doi: 10.1007/s12109-012-9272-5
  • Brügger, N., & Finnemann, N. O. (2013). Web and digital humanities: Theoretical and methodological concerns. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 57(1).
  • Bryson, T., & Association of Research Libraries. (2011). Digital humanities. Washington, DC: Association of Research Libraries.
  • Bulger, M. E., Meyer, E. T., De la Flor, G., Terras, M., Wyatt, S., Jirotka, M., … Madsen, C. M. (2011). Reinventing research? Information practices in the humanities. SSRN Working Paper Series. doi: 10.2139/ssrn.1859267
  • Burden, M. P. (2012). The hidden persuasions of algorithms (M.A.). University of Alberta (Canada), Canada.
  • Burdick, A. (2012). Digital humanities. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Capurro, R. (2010). Digital hermeneutics: an outline. AI & Society, 25(1), 35–42. doi: 10.1007/s00146-009-0255-9
  • Carpenter, M., Graybill, J., Offord, J., & Piorun, M. (2011). Envisioning the library’s role in scholarly communication in the year 2025. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 11(2), 659–681.
  • Chen, S., & Hsueh-hua, C. (2012). Mapping multilingual lexical semantics for knowledge organization systems. The Electronic Library, 30(2), 278–294. doi: 10.1108/02640471211221386
  • Christenson, H. (2011). HathiTrust: A Research library at web scale. Library Resources & Technical Services, 55(2), 93–102.
  • Clement, T., Hagenmaier, W., & Knies, J. L. (2013). Toward a notion of the archive of the future: Impressions of practice by librarians, archivists, and digital humanities scholars. The Library Quarterly, 83(2).
  • Cohen, D. J. (2013). New approaches to scholarship and teaching from digital humanities. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
  • Cohen, D.J., Rosenzweig, R. (2006). Digital history. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
  • Coover, R., Bartscherer, T., Pandora, K. (2012). Switching codes: thinking through digital technology in the humanities and the arts. Technology and culture, 53(4), 961–962.
  • Courtney, A. (2013). Alliance of digital humanities organizations. Choice, 50(8), 1414–1415.
  • Craig, K. (2011). The Ouroboros; or, How «digital» and «humanities» will shape each other in the near future. EDUCAUSE Review, 46(5).
  • Dalbello, M. (2011). A genealogy of digital humanities. Journal of Documentation, 67(3), 480–506. doi: 10.1108/00220411111124550
  • Deegan, M. (2012). Collaborative research in the digital humanities. Burlington, VT: Ashgate Pub.
  • DeLyser, D., & Sui, D. (2013). Crossing the qualitative- quantitative divide II: Inventive approaches to big data, mobile methods, and rhythmanalysis. Progress in Human Geography, 37(2), 293–305. doi: 10.1177/0309132512444063
  • Desrichard, Y. (2012). For digital humanism. Bulletin des Bibliotheques de France, 57(3), 85–86.
  • Digital humanities and digital preservation. (2013). D-Lib Magazine, 19(5/6), 7–7.
  • Dougherty, J. (2013). Writing history in the digital age. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
  • Drucker, J. (2009). SpecLab: digital aesthetics and projects in speculative computing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Earhart, A. E. (2011). The American literature scholar in the digital age. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press and University of Michigan Library.
  • Eccles, K. E., Thelwall, M., & Meyer, E. T. (2012). Measuring the web impact of digitised scholarly resources. Journal of Documentation, 68(4), 512–526. doi: 10.1108/00220411211239084
  • Edelson, S. M., & Ferster, B. (2013). MapScholar: A Web tool for publishing interactive cartographic collections. Journal of Map & Geography Libraries, 9(1/2), 81–107. doi:10.1080/15420353.2012.747463
  • Eden, K., & Beaubien, A. K. (2012). HathiTrust: digital access at the intersection of interlibrary lending potential and the protection of intellectual property rights. Interlending & Document Supply, 40(2), 94–99. doi: 10.1108/02641611211239560
  • Frederiksen, L. J. (2012). Digital humanities now. Choice, 50(3), 445.
  • Gibbs, F. W., & Cohen, D. J. (2011). Conversation with data: Prospecting Victorian words and ideas. Victorian Studies, 54(1), 69–77,185.
  • Gibson, C. (2011). Digital scholarship 2009. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(1), 86–87.
  • Gladney, H. M. (2012). Long-term digital preservation: a digital humanities topic? Historical social research, 37(3), 201–217.
  • Guerlac, S. (2011). Humanities 2.0: E-learning in the digital world. Representations, (116), 102–0_6.
  • Haddow, G. (2012). Knowledge, skills and attributes for academic reference librarians. Australian Academic and Research Libraries, 43(3), 231–248.
  • Hagood, J. (2012). Brief introduction to data mining projects in the humanities. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Online), 38(4), 20–23.
  • Hahn, T. B., Burright, M., & Duggan, H. N. (2011). Has the revolution in scholarly communication lived up to its promise? Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Online), 37(5), 24–28.
  • Harris-Pierce, R. L., & Liu, Y. Q. (2012). Is data curation education at library and information science schools in North America adequate? New Library World, 113(11/12), 598–613. doi: 10.1108/03074801211282957
  • Hazen, D. (2010). Rethinking research library collections. Library Resources & Technical Services, 54(2), 115–121.
  • High, S., Mills, J., & Zembrzycki, S. (2012). Telling our stories/animating our past: A Status Report on Oral History and Digital Media. Canadian Journal of Communication, 37(3), 383–403.
  • Huggett, J. (2012). Core or periphery? Digital humanities from an archaeological perspective. Historical social research, 37(3), 86–105.
  • Jackson Jr., J. L. (2012). Ethnography is, ethnography ain’t. Cultural Anthropology, 27(3), 480–497. doi:10.1111/j.1548-1360.2012.01155.x
  • Jockers, Matthew L., Sag, M., & Schultz, J. (2012). Don’t let copyright block data mining. Nature, 490(7418), 29–30.
  • Jockers, Matthew Lee. (2013). Digital methods and literary history. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
  • Jones, S. (2012). When computers read: Literary analysis and digital technology. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Online), 38(4), 27–30.
  • Kamada, H. (2010). Digital humanities: Roles for libraries? College & Research Libraries News, 71(9).
  • Kapsidelis, K. (2011, April 10). Digital work expands access to war history / UR and Tech mine papers, aim to give shape to the era. Richmond Times – Dispatch. Richmond, Va.
  • Kaser, D. (2013). Data are big. Information Today, 30(3), 3.
  • Kelly, T. M. (2013). Teaching history in the digital age. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.
  • Klein, L. F. (2012). American studies after the internet. American Quarterly, 64(4), 861–872, 915.
  • Kretzschmar, W. A., & Gray Potter, W. (2010). Library collaboration with large digital humanities projects. Literary & Linguistic Computing, 25(4), 439–445. doi:10.1093/llc/fqq022
  • LaBelle, C., Anderson-Wilk, M., & Emanuel, R. (2011). Leveraging new media in the scholarship of engagement: Opportunities and incentives. Journal of Extension, 49(6), 13.
  • Lam, M. (2012). Beyond the score: Music visualization and digital humanities. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Online), 38(4), 45–47.
  • Lee, C. A. (Cal). (2011). A framework for contextual information in digital collections. Journal of Documentation, 67(1), 95–143. doi: 10.1108/00220411111105470
  • Little, G. (2011). We are all digital humanists now. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(4), 352–354. doi: 10.1016/j.acalib.2011.04.023
  • Liu, A. (2012). State of the digital humanities: A Report and a critique. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 11(1), 34.
  • Loet, L., & Salah, A. A. A. (2010). Maps on the basis of the arts humanities citation index: The Journals Leonardo and Art Journal versus “digital humanities” as a topic. Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, 61(4), 787–801. doi:10.1002/asi.21303
  • Lorang, E., & Zillig, B. P. (2012). Electronic text analysis and nineteenth-century newspapers: TokenX and the Richmond Daily Dispatch. Texas Studies in Literature and Language, 54(3), 303–323.
  • Losoff, B., & Pence, H. E. (2010). Digital scholarship and open access. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 38(2), 95–101.
  • Lynch, C., & Carleton, D. E. . (2012). Lecture: Impact of digital scholarship on research libraries. Journal of Library Administration, 52(6/7), 456–473. doi:10.1080/01930826.2012.707947
  • Mandell, L. (2013). Digitizing the archive: The Necessity of an «early modern» period. Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, 13(2), 83–92,111.
  • Margolin, S. (2012). Pale males 2.0: Revisiting a traditional american studies project using digital humanities tools. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Online), 38(4), 24–26.
  • Marty, P. F. (2012). Unintended consequences: Unlimited access, invisible work and the future of the information profession in cultural heritage organizations. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (Online), 38(3), 27–31.
  • McGowan, S. (2012). Obstacle or opportunity? Digital thresholds in professional development. The Journal of Faculty Development, 26(3), 25–28.
  • Meister, J. C. (2012). DH is Us or on the unbearable lightness of a shared methodology. Historical social research, 37(3), 77–85.
  • Meloni, J. C. (2010). Curate, create, and play: Pathways into hypermediated literary scholarship (Ph.D.). Washington State University, United States — Washington.
  • Morillas-Torné, M. (2012). Creation of a geo-spatial database to analyse railways in Europe (1830-2010). A Historical GIS approach. Journal of Geographic Information System, 4(2), 176–187.
  • Muri, A. (2013). Twenty years after the death of the book: Literature, the humanities, and the knowledge economy. English Studies in Canada, 38(1), 115–140.
  • Mutula, S. M. (2011). Ethics and trust in digital scholarship. The Electronic Library, 29(2), 261–276. doi: 10.1108/02640471111125212
  • Niles, R. L. (2012). Thresholds of engagement: Integrating image-based digital resources into textual scholarship (M.I.St.). University of Toronto, Canada.
  • Nowviskie, B. (2013). Skunks in the library: A Path to production for scholarly R&D. Journal of Library Administration, 53(1), 53–66. doi:10.1080/01930826.2013.756698
  • Nutefall, J. E., & Chadwell, F. A. (2012). Preparing for the 21st century: Academic library realignment. New Library World, 113(3/4), 162–173. doi: 10.1108/03074801211218543
  • Oberlander, C. (2012). Why mission-critical systems are critical to the future of academic libraries. Computers in Libraries, 32(8), 15–18.
  • Pearce, N., Weller, M., Scanlon, E., & Kinsley, S. (2010). Digital scholarship considered: How new technologies could transform academic work. Policy and Practice in Education, 16(1).
  • Pepper, S. (2013). How we think: digital media and contemporary technogenesis. Choice, 50(6), 1033.
  • Piotrowski, M. (2012). Natural language processing for historical texts. San Rafael, Calif.: Morgan & Claypool.
  • Plutchak, T. S. (2012). Breaking the barriers of time and space: the dawning of the great age of librarians. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 100(1), 10–19.
  • Posner, M. (2013). No half measures: Overcoming common challenges to doing digital humanities in the library. Journal of Library Administration, 53(1), 43–52. doi:10.1080/01930826.2013.756694
  • Prescott, A. (2012). Consumers, creators or commentators? Problems of audience and mission in the digital humanities. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 11(1), 15.
  • Pressley, L., & Gilbertson, K. (2011). Librarians as experts. Computers in Libraries, 31(4), 19–23.
  • PrianiSaiso, E., & Galina, I. (2012). Finding support for disruption: developing a digital humanities project in Mexico. Aslib proceedings: New information perspectives, 64(1), 97–103.
  • Ramsay, S. (2011). Reading machines: toward an algorithmic criticism. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
  • Rasmussen, E. D. (2010). From papyrus to hypertext: toward the universal digital library. Choice, 47(5), 878.
  • Ray, J. (2012). The rise of digital curation and cyberinfrastructure: From experimentation to implementation and maybe integration. Library Hi Tech, 30(4), 604–622. doi: 10.1108/07378831211285086
  • Reilly, S. K., Lefferts, M., & Moyle, M. (2012). Collaboration to build a meaningful connection between library content and the researcher. New Review of Information Networking, 17(1), 34–42. doi: 10.1080/13614576.2012.678139
  • Rice, J. (2013). Occupying the digital humanities. College English, 75(4), 360–378.
  • Rieger, Oya Y. (2010). Framing digital humanities: The role of new media in humanities scholarship. First Monday, 15(10).
  • Rieger, Oya Yildirim. (2010). Humanities scholarship in the digital age: The role and influence of information and communication technologies (Ph.D.). Cornell University, United States — New York.
  • Rockenbach, B. (2013). Introduction. (Special Issue: Digital Humanities in Libraries: New Models for Scholarly Engagement.) Jounal of Library Administration, 53(1), 1-9. doi: 10.1080/01930826.2013.756676
  • Roy, C., & Frandy, T. (2013). Examining augmented reality as a platform for situated ethnography through the lens of the ARIS Wisconsin uprising game. Journal of American Folklore, 126(499), 70–78, 113.
  • Roy, Michael. (2013). Is linking thinking? Addressing and assessing scholarship in a digital era. EDUCAUSE Review, 48(1), 52–53.
  • Ruvane, M. B. (2012). Digital humanities: Envisioning a collaborative tool for mapping, evaluating, and sharing reconstructed colonial American parcel maps (Ph.D.). The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States — North Carolina.
  • Rydberg-Cox, J. A. (2006). Digital libraries and the challenges of digital humanities. Oxford: Chandos.
  • Samuels, R. G., & Griffy, H. (2012). Evaluating open source software for use in library initiatives: A Case study involving electronic publishing. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12(1), 41–62.
  • Savage, J. P. (2011). Technography and the sociology of texts: Reading phenomena in the digital humanities (Ph.D.). Fordham University, United States — New York.
  • Scanlon, E. (2012). Digital futures: Changes in scholarship, open educational resources, and the inevitability of interdisciplinarity. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 11(1-2), 177–184.
  • Schmidt, D. (2012). The role of markup in the digital humanities. Historical social research, 37(3), 125–146.
  • Scholars’ lab – Institute for Enabling Geospatial Scholarship. (s.d.). Retrieved from http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/scholarslab/geospatial/
  • Schreibman, S. (2012). Digital humanities: centres and peripheries. Historical social research, 37(3), 46–58.
  • Schreur, P. E. (2012). Academy unbound: Linked data as revolution. Library Resources & Technical Services, 56(4), 227–237.
  • Seadle, M. (2012). Archiving in the digital world: the scholarly literature. Library Hi Tech, 30(2), 367–375. doi: 10.1108/07378831211240021
  • Shepard, D. L. (2012). Parsing fiction: Humanistic computing and the postmodern novel (Ph.D.). University of California, Los Angeles.
  • Sicilia, M.-A. (2011). 2009 Metadata and Semantics Research (MTSR) Conference and 2009 African Digital Scholarship and Curation conference. Electronic library, 29(2), 126.
  • Siemens, L., Cunningham, R., Duff, W., & Warwick, C. (2011). A tale of two cities: implications of the similarities and differences in collaborative approaches within the digital libraries and digital humanities communities. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 26(3), 335–348. doi: 10.1093/llc/fqr028
  • Simeone, M., Guiliano, J., Kooper, R., & Bajcsy, P. (2011). Digging into data: Using new collaborative infrastructures supporting humanities-based computer science research. First Monday, 16(5).
  • Smith, K., & Davis, S. (2013). Copyright in a digital age: Conflict, risk, and reward. The Serials Librarian, 64(1-4), 57–66. doi:10.1080/0361526X.2013.759875
  • Sternfeld, J. (2011). Archival theory and digital historiography: Selection, search, and metadata as archival processes for assessing historical contextualization. The American Archivist, 74(2), 544–575.
  • Sula, Chris Alen1. (2013). Digital humanities and libraries: A Conceptual model. Journal of Library Administration, 53(1), 10–26. doi:10.1080/01930826.2013.756680
  • Svensson, P. (2012). Digital humanities as a humanities project. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 11(1-2), 42–60.
  • Tebeau, M. (2013). Listening to the city: Oral history and place in the digital era. Oral History Review, 40(1), 25–35.
  • Thaller, M. (2012). Controversies around the digital humanities: an agenda. Historical social research, 37(3), 7–23.
  • Thomas, M. L. (2012). Disruption and disintermediation: A Review of the collection development and management literature, 2009-10. Library Resources & Technical Services, 56(3), 183–198.
  • Tibbo, H. R. (2012). Placing the horse before the cart: conceptual and technical dimensions of digital curation. Historical social research, 37(3), 187–200.
  • Underberg, N. M. Z. (2013). Anthropology, narrative, and new media. Austin: University of Texas Press.
  • Vandegrift, M., & Varner, S. (2013). Evolving in common: Creating mutually supportive relationships between libraries and the digital humanities. Journal of Library Administration, 53(1), 67–78. doi:10.1080/01930826.2013.756699
  • Veletsianos, G., & Kimmons, R. (2012). Networked participatory scholarship: Emergent techno-cultural pressures toward open and digital scholarship in online networks. Computers & Education, 58(2), 766–774.
  • Vershbow, B. (2013). NYPL Labs: Hacking the Library. Journal of Library Administration, 53(1), 79–96. doi:10.1080/01930826.2013.756701
  • Vinopal, J., & McCormick, M. (2013). Supporting digital scholarship in research libraries: Scalability and sustainability. Journal of Library Administration, 53(1), 27–42. doi:10.1080/01930826.2013.756689
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